Period One

A. Challenging Contras and Squares

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Adina Gordon (A)

Ready for a challenge? We’ll assume you’re solid in the basics and want to expand your dance frontiers. Come dance contras & squares to befuddle, entertain, and stimulate!

B. Singing in Harmony

Jon Pickow (U)

We will sing a variety of songs and discuss how to improvise and develop harmony lines. We’ll also delve into the difference between a chordal approach, as opposed to a counter-melodic approach to harmony singing. We’ll take turns singing harmony and melody, so that everyone gets a chance to try their hand at improvising the harmony part.

C. Beginning Danish Dancing

Karen Bertelsen (B)

In this class we will work on the traditional basic steps and figures in Danish folk dancing. This will include the couple dances polka, waltz, hopsa, and schottische. These steps will be included in squares, circles, and other formations. You will feel the energy and community in our dances. Your heart beats faster and you will get a big smile on your lips.

D. Morris Dance for All

John Mayberry (U)

Using the particular take on the Bampton tradition of The Marlboro Morris Men, we will work on dancing together – keeping the flashes of the hankies uniform and moving as lines and sets. The stepping is not overly vigorous, but we will drill it to unify our timing and movements so that, in a figure, we can really experience the unity that makes the performance of a dance worth watching. All are welcome.

E. Intermediate Recorder

Wayne Hankin (I)

Open to all with abilities to play different sizes of recorder. Must be able to read music as we’ll be exploring music from several centuries, including a few new works by Wayne.

F. English Callers Workshop

Barbara Finney (U)

This workshop will include time for practice teaching and the discussion of various topics. Depending on participants’ backgrounds and interests, topics will include dance programming, teaching figures and style, working with beginners and mixed-experience crowds, music and working with your band, stage presence and crowd control.

G. Woodcarving 101

Thomas German (U)

Use your artistic skills to carve pendants, pins, spoons, spatulas or spreaders. We will focus on basic carving principles and techniques as well as carving safety. Carving tools and other materials will be provided.
($15 material fee payable at class) (20 person limit for the class).

H. Intro-mediate Rapper

Gillian Stewart (B/I)

Rapper is a fast-paced, physical, percussive sword dance from the north of England. This class will be geared towards those who have interest and enthusiasm in learning a new style, as well as those who want a refresher on the basics of putting together a satisfying dance. Intermediate dancers will work on dance choreography and set cohesion, as well as getting some new figures. Please bring hard soled shoes and be prepared to get your knuckles scraped.


Period Two

A. Advanced English Country Dance

10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Barbara Finney (A)

We will focus on style, technique and figures for dancers who want to take their dancing to the next level of enjoyment. Dances will include a variety of historical reconstructions and modern compositions, some familiar, some new and challenging. For advanced dancers familiar with the basic repertoire of figures.

B. Songs from the Past to the Present

Donna & Lewis Lamb (U)

This class will be a sharing time for old and new folk songs and bluegrass. Come all and have fun with singing. If you play an instrument, bring it along.

C. Intermediate English Country Dance

Brad Foster (I)

Beginning English country dancers often focus on learning the figures. For dancers comfortable with those basics, in this session we’ll look at some other elements that bring choreography to life and make music visible: connect discrete figures into seamless flow, acknowledge and support partners and neighbors, move in a variety of moods, and spread joy as you travel… in short, how to dance! We’ll revisit familiar older dances and explore many recent compositions.

D. Beginning English Country Dance

Katy German (B)

This class will be a fun and easy introduction to English Country Dancing. We will learn many basic recurring figures, and steadily build up a repertoire as the week progresses. Beyond mere execution of figures, we will delve into style and technique, and discover how a simple right hand turn can become something magical. Basic waltz will also be taught. Skeptical contra dancers welcome!

E. Contra & Square Calling Workshop

Adina Gordon (U)

This is a class for both current and interested callers of contra and square dances. Each day we’ll focus on different topics: basic calling, walkthroughs, programming, working with musicians, and more. Class will include discussion, dancing, and oodles of practice time. Whether you’re a new caller, an experienced caller, or a non-caller who’s curious about what callers do, there’s something for everyone.

F. Storytelling Essentials

Mary Hamilton (B)

Explore the basics of storytelling by learning to tell a short tale. You can choose to tell a story from your life, or a folktale, or a tale you’ve made up. Some folktales will be available for those who arrive with no story in mind.

G. Jews Harp

Wayne Hankin (U)

Come all harp twangers advanced or beginner and show up to class cause it’s a real winner. You’ll learn all techniques, whatever your abilities be, and twang your way to jews harp virtuosity. We’ll even learn tricks and a few more I know, and show them off in parlor and hence steal the show.

H. Basketry for All (One)

Janet Northern (U)

We will be using oak handles to make traditional style baskets, woven with reed and other materials. A variety of colors and sizes of reed will be available to choose from so that each basket will be unique. You can keep it basic or feel free to experiment with your own ideas.
($15 material fee payable at class) (20 person limit for the class)

I. Beginning Clogging/Flatfooting

Becky Hill (B)

We will explore both clogging and flatfooting, learn how to create our own steps, and how to improvise to live Appalachian old-time music. Appalachian percussive dance is a blend of Irish, West African, and American Indian dances and is a vibrant American dance tradition. We will explore the basics of buck dance, flatfooting and clogging and learn steps from Thomas Maupin, Robert Dotson and many others. No previous experience necessary, bring smooth soled or leather bottom shoes.


Period Three

 

A. Morningsong & Stories

11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

 

Patty Tarter (U)

This is a time for the entire CCDS community to gather together for music and fellowship. Participants are welcome to share songs or stories, or just come for the joy of singing together.


Period Four

A. Contras for All

1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Adina Gordon (B/I)

Join us for a welcoming mix of entertaining and delightful dances accessible to everyone. We’ll explore each dance and find the place where music, dance, and our own personal style meet for maximum enjoyment.

B. Ritchie Family Songs and Traditions

Jon Pickow (U)

We’ll learn and sing some of the songs from the Ritchie Family of Kentucky, including some written by Jean Ritchie. We’ll also discuss the history of the songs, and how they came into the family repertoire. Songs will be interspersed with family stories and archival video from the Ritchie/Pickow collection. Each time I’ve taught this class it’s been like having some friends on the Ritchie family porch to share songs, stories and images of the past.

C. English Village Dances

Jim Morrison (U)

We will do vigorous and fun dances from different parts of England – the rants of Northumberland, square eights from Cumberland and Yorkshire, reels from Devon and Cornwall, polkas from Sussex. In social function comparable to the square and contra dances of North America, sets of Ireland, Scottish reels and square eights, these dances are musically like English morris and sword dances.

D. Kentucky Set Running

Jim Napier Stites & Ben

All ages and experience levels will enjoy this class. Dance figures taught will be those included in Kentucky Mountain Square Dancing by Patrick E. Napier. Many of the figures have not changed since the Appalachian Mountains were first settled. Some figures will be familiar to those with experience dancing Appalachian Big Set. Beginners will learn enough figures to dance all night long, and experienced dancers will enjoy dancing to the finest music around!

E. Beginning Recorder

Wayne Hankin (B)

If you ever wanted to get your basics down, this is a good starting point. Learn the proper techniques to get you started off on the right foot and we’ll explore music you can play right away.

F. Working the Story (2 hours)

Mary Hamilton (I/A)

Got a story you want help with? Whether it’s a new story or one you’ve been telling that’s not quite working the way you want, bring it here. We’ll skip the basics because this class is for tellers who are already comfortable with an audience. Using a structured storyteller-centered coaching process, attention will be paid to each participant’s story.

G. Intermediate Temari Craft

Eric Crowden (I)

Ready to take temari to another level? You will learn a more complex division of the ball that will lead to even more intricate and fascinating designs. This class is suitable for people who have had the Beginning Temari class at Dance School or have learned temari basics elsewhere.
($15 material fee payable at class) (25 person limit for the class)

H. Mummers Play

John Mayberry (U)

If you’ve seen a Mummers’ Play before, you know that it’s essentially a loud performance of some nonsensical doggerel presented by a group of people in disguise. It comes to us here and now mostly from the collected versions of seasonal, community-based plays that are still done in parts of England and Ireland. What you may not know is that many communities and cultures all around the world have traditions of allowing certain kinds of excess, breaking of taboos, and doing things that are disruptive. These traditions often include disguising and saying ritualistic things. John will guide the class in finding our own way to present a brand new play to share with everyone at the end of the week. No acting experience necessary, just a willingness to play.

I. Intermediate/Advanced Clogging/Flatfooting

Becky Hill (I/A)

We will explore footwork and choreography based in Appalachian Percussive Dance looking at musicality, technique and improvisation. We will start class with daily drills to get clean percussive sounds, explore how to dance solo and in a group and have fun doing all of it.


Period Five

A. English Dance Open Mic/Open Band

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Brad Foster/Dean Herington (U)

For dancers, this is another time in the day to enjoy English country dancing called by your peers. For callers, this is a chance to get more practice time and to receive constructive feedback on your calling from Brad Foster. For musicians, come and join the band under the guidance of Dean Herington.

B. Intermediate/Advanced Dance Band

David Crandall (I/A)

This class will be a chance for the intermediate/advanced player to move beyond “just playing the tune” and into the inner game of dance musicianship. We’ll explore ways of thinking strategically about rhythm, tune choice, harmonies, counter-melodies, and other aspects of the art of levitating others through the use of wind, wood and string. All sorts of instruments and styles welcome!

C. Int/Adv Danish Dance

Karen Bertelsen (U)

In this class, we will work with historical couple dances, squares and other figures. Dance of the family of hambo as polonaise, Sønderhoning and minuet. We will be dancing waltz in different formations and become familiar with the fifth figure in the Les Lancers, as is has evolved in Denmark. This fifth figure has been used in an unbroken tradition in Denmark for more than 140 years and is still used on festive occasions, in particular the Danish royal family and at college graduations parties.
Karen`s daughter Line will assist with this class.

D. West Virginia Square Dances

Becky Hill (U)

This workshop will focus on Appalachian dance traditions, specifically big circle and four couple square figures found and collected from West Virginia master square dance callers; Mack Samples, Lou Maiuri, Ellen & Eugene Ratcliffe, Bill Ohse and many others. We’ll present the basics of calling, choreography, patter and teaching. A major facet of community dance is inclusion, therefore no prior experience is necessary, and all ages are welcome.

E. Beginning Dance Band

Andrea Hoag (B)

Build your confidence, acquire repertoire, and feel the joy of playing as a band. We’ll investigate some key topics: What makes dancers happy? What if I don’t know all the notes? How can I be a better leader/follower/partner? Bring your instrument, a sense of humor, and a taste for adventure.

F. Working the Story (2 hours continued)

ary Hamilton (I/A)

G. Basketry for All (Two)

Janet Northern (U)

We will be using the same materials and techniques as in the first class to create one-of-a-kind baskets. If you have taken this class before, I will encourage you to try different patterns and weaving styles. There will be a basic basket for those who have not made baskets before. You can choose to keep your basket very simple or feel free to experiment and try new things.
($15 material fee payable at class) (20 person limit for the class)

H. Advanced Performance Rapper

Gillian Stewart (A)

For those who are comfortable with stepping and basic figures. We will work on putting together dances that focus on the performance aspects of rapper: audience engagement, set unity, and wow-factor. Expect to dance different positions and step outside your comfort zone! Each set will develop a distinctive style that might include fooling, uncommon stepping, acrobatics, singing, or anything else you might bring to the class.


Period Six

A. Bollywood for All

4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Laurie Cumming (U)

Bollywood returns to CCDS! In our class we will focus on this style of popular South Asian dancing, beginning each session with a substantial strength and flexibility warm-up followed by a series of moves inspired by cobras, butterflies and a popular western dance move. Get ready to move those hips in new and unusual ways!

B. Shape Note Singing

Jon Pickow (U)

We’ll explore the traditions of shape note singing and sing hymns from The Sacred Harp Collection, using the four-shape system that was taught in Singing Schools in the 1800’s, which is still in wide use today. Reading music is helpful but not required. These uniquely American masterpieces (some dating to Colonial times) give an excellent insight into the structure of harmonies, counter melodies and canonic imitation in vocal music, as well as being a sheer delight to sing.

C. Squares and Odd Formations

Brad Foster (U)

This class will include a great selection of New England singing squares, old-time patter squares, and odd formations from contra, square, and
English ceilidh dance traditions.

D. Beginning Temari Craft

Eric Crowden (B)

Temari is an ancient Japanese handcraft of first thread-wrapping a ball and then embroidering colorful designs across the surface. You will learn to create the base, some basic stitching techniques and different patterns that can open up endless design possibilities.
($15 material fee payable at class) (25 person limit for the class)

E. Longsword Dance

Barbara Finney (U)

We’ll learn the traditional dance from Kirkbymoorside as danced by Still River Sword. Figures include triangles, poussette, rolls and third over, and we’ll get to make the lock twice. Come join the fun. All levels of experience welcome.